nervous.jpgDo You find Tech confusing? What does it all mean?

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Everything you need to know about Techno Mumbo Jumbo!!!




A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N| O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z



A



Affinity Groups
Groups or communities that unite individuals with common interests. Electronic spaces extend the range of possibilities for such groups.
Aggre
gator/Aggregation
A website that keeps track of blog posts, news feeds or other information. Gathering information from multiple websites, typically via RSS (Really Simple Syndication), an aggregator pulls together the most recently published information.
Annotated Bibliography
A bibliography that includes a summary and/or evaluation of each of the sources. Depending on your project or the assignment, your annotations may serve as a summary, an assessment and/or evaluation of your sources.
Assessment
'Process of collecting, analyzing, and reporting data about student accomplishments and understandings throughout a learning experience. Forms of assessment include tests, observations, self assessments, conferences, logs, graphic organizers, surveys, checklists, rubrics and interviews.
Authentic Assessment
Assessment techniques that require students to originate a response to a task or question, using knowledge in real world ways, with genuine purposes, audiences and situational variables; may include demonstrations, exhibits, portfolios, oral presentations or essays. Authentic assessment helps to measure how effectively students apply knowledge to the real world.
Avatar
A digital representation of an individual shown along with a screen name, typically in a virtualreality environment or on a social networking site.

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Bandwidth
The amount of data that can be transmitted over a network in a fixed amount of time. Bandwidth is the fundamental networking parameter, and is usually measured in kilobits, megabits or gigabits per second (Kbps, Mbps, or Gbps).
Benchmark
Statement that provides a description of student knowledge expected at specific grades, ages or developmental levels. Benchmarks are often used in conjunction with standards and provide concrete indicators of student understanding.
Bibliography
A list of sources (books, journals, Web sites, periodicals, etc.) used for researching a topic. Bibliographies are sometimes called references or works cited depending on the style format you are using. A bibliography usually just includes the bibliographic information (i.e., the author, title, publisher, etc.).
Blog / Blog Network / Blogosphere
A blog, which is short for web log, is series of articles usually written in a slightly informal tone. While many blogs are online personal journals, blogs cover the full range from personal to news to business with subject matter that ranges from personal to serious to humorous to creative. A blog network is a series of blogs hosted by the same Web site or company, while the blogosphere refers to all blogs across the Internet regardless of whether they are an individual blog or part of a blog network.
Blogs /Weblogs -- Web logs
Web logs ("blogs" for short) are interactive Web sites, often open to the public, that serve as journals and can include Web links and photographs as well as audio and video elements. Some 60 million blogs have been published on the Internet over the past five years.
Blogs /Weblogs--Web logs
Interactive websites, often open to the public, that serve as journals and can include Web links and photographs as well as audio and video elements. Some 60 million blogs have been published on the Internet over the past five years.
Boolean logic
A system developed by English mathematician George Boole in the mid-19th century which was instrumental in the development of computers and search engines. A Boolean search uses AND, OR and NOT (the primary operators of Boolean logic) to limit and refine a search (e.g., Bengals NOT football, china AND dishes). A Venn Diagram can help illustrate how AND, OR and NOT work.
Brainstorm
To find solutions to a challenge or problem by spontaneously generating a variety of possible solutions, either individually or in a group.
Browser
The program that serves as your front end to the Web on the Internet. In order to view a site, you type its address (URL) into the browser's Location field.

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Citation
A reference to a book, article, Web page or other published item (with sufficient details to uniquely identify the item) for the purpose of giving credit to the creator of the information.
Cite
To give credit to the creator of an original work.
Clip
A short piece of a film or video.
Cloud / Cloud Computing
The Internet is sometimes referred to as the "Cloud." Cloud Computing refers to the recent trend of using the Internet as an application platform, such as using an online version of a word processor as opposed to using a word processor that is installed on your computer's hard drive. It also refers to using the Internet as a service, like storing all of your pictures online at Flickr rather than keeping them on your hard drive.
Collaboration
Demonstrate ability to work effectively and respectfully with diverse teams. Exercise flexibility and willingness to be helpful in making necessary compromises to accomplish a common goal. Assume shared responsibility for collaborative work, and value the individual contributions made by each team member.
Communication
Articulate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written and nonverbal communication skills in a variety of forms and contexts. Listen effectively to decipher meaning, including knowledge, values, attitudes and intentions. Use communication for a range of purposes (e.g., to inform, instruct, motivate and persuade).
Constructivism
Learning theory that suggests optimal learning occurs when individuals are actively engaged in authentic and meaningful tasks and have opportunities to interpret and reflect on these interactions. As school library media specialists, the goal of instruction is not to inform, but rather to create situations in which students are able to "construct" new understandings.
Copyright
The legal right to reproduce, publish or sell the contents and form of a literary, musical or artistic work. Works protected by copyright require the permission of the creator for their use. Fair use allows for limited use for educational purposes.
Creative Commons
A nonprofit organization that promotes free public licenses to content (http://creativecommons.org). Provides specific conditions through which content can be reused, such as attributions, links or other notification methods to correctly identify the original source.
Creativity
Use a wide range of idea creation techniques (such as brainstorming). Create new and worthwhile ideas (both incremental and radical concepts). Elaborate, refine, analyze and evaluate their own ideas in order to improve and maximize creative efforts.
Critical stance
Attitude or disposition toward learning in which students are positioned to develop an understanding of a topic or issue through objectivity, inquiry, hypothesis, analysis and evaluation, comparing and contrasting, and consideration of implications.

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D



Diagnostic assessment
This type of assessment is the use of formal or informal measurement tools to assess an individual's area of strengths and needs for purposes of identifying appropriate learning modifications or adaptations. Two examples of diagnostic assessment tools include running records (informal) and Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children (formal).
Differentiated instruction
Teaching theory based on the belief that instructional approaches should vary and be adapted for individual and diverse students in classrooms. The intent of differentiating instruction is "to maximize each student's growth and individual success by meeting each student where he or she is, and assisting in the learning process" (Hall 2002, para. 2).
Digital Video Collection (DVC)
Set of digital video titles obtained by Ohio's Area Media Centers and INFOhio. Videos are available free of charge to all Ohio students, teachers and staff.
Digtial literacy
Ability to understand, evaluate, create and integrate information in multiple digital formats via the computer and Internet (Gilster 1997).

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e-book
An eBook is an electronic version of a traditional print book that can be read by using a personal computer or by using an eBook reader.
e-book reader
A handheld device specialized for reading electronic books. Starting in the late 1990s, e-book readers began to appear; however, it took nearly 10 years to gain any traction due to the many formats on the market. In addition, until E Ink electronic paper technology was used for the display, battery life was a limiting factor.
E-portfolios
Student work that is generated, selected, organized, stored and revised digitally. Often electronic portfolios are accessible to multiple audiences, and some models can be moved from one site to another easily. E-portfolios can document the process of learning, promote integrative thinking, display polished work and/or provide a space for reflecting on learning.

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Facebook
The name of a social networking site (SNS) that connects people with friends and others who work, study and live around them. People use Facebook to keep in touch with friends, post photos, share links and exchange other information. Facebook users can see only the profiles of confirmed friends and the people in their networks.
Fair use
The allowable use of limited amounts of a copyrighted work for the purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship or research.
Formative assessment
This type of assessment is ongoing and provides information about what students are learning and how that learning is taking place. It gives students feedback on their progress and provides teachers with feedback on the effectiveness of their instruction (Donham 2008, 266; Harada and Yoshina 2005, 1).

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gigaPoP (gigabit point of presence)
A regional internetworking aggregation point. Because "PoP" is the previously-established acronym for "point of presence", and because "gigabit" is not usually capitalized, "gigaPoP" is the correct capitalization.?GigE (Gigabit Ethernet) An Ethernet version with a speed of 1 Gbps. The most advanced version of Ethernet to date is 10 GigE, operating at 10 Gbps.?grid A system for large-scale wide-area distributed computing. Making the software to make grids work is one of the main challenges facing designers of advanced networks. Globus (http://www.globus.org/) and the Open Grid Forum (http://www.gridforum.org/) are among the principal organizations for grid development.
Global perspective
Individual's awareness and understanding of the changing world with regard to global issues, culture, and connections, and the individual's roles and responsibilities as a member of the global community (Collins, Czarra, and Smith 2003).
Guided practice
Instructional strategy that enables students to "practice a new skill or strategy while the teacher provides close monitoring, immediate feedback, and assistance as needed".

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H.323
A set of ITU standards for Internet videoconferencing and VoIP. More information on H.323 is available from http://www.packetizer.com/iptel/h323/.
Higher level thinking/questioning
Ability to think and question in a manner that requires consideration and application of complex concepts, problem solving skills and reflection. Bloom's Taxonomy identifies a hierarchy of six levels of thinking, with the top three (analysis, synthesis and evaluation) classified as higher order thinking skills.
Hypertext
Electronic texts that provide multiple links, allowing users to trace ideas in immediate and idiosyncratic directions. Hypermedia adds sound, video, animation and/or virtual reality environments to the user's choices.Another related term, interactive multimedia, may be used interchangeably with Hypermedia.
Hypothesis
Something not proved, but assumed to be true, for purposes of argument or further study or investigation.

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ICT
Information and communication technology, ICT refers to the use of computers and computer software to convert, store, process, transmit and retrieve information.
Independent practice
Instructional strategy that enables students to "practice newly learned content, skills or strategies on their own with no direct teacher assistance".
Information literacy
Skill set needed to find, retrieve, analyze and use information effectively.
Innovation
Act on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the field in which the innovation will occur.
Inquiry
Stance toward learning in which the learner is engaged in asking questions and finding answers, not simply accumulating facts presented by someone else that have no relation to previous learning or new understanding. Inquiry follows a continuum of learning experiences, from simply discovering a new idea or an answer to a question to following a complete inquiry process.
Internet2™ Network
An advanced hybrid optical and packet network for the U.S. research and education community. See http://www.internet2.edu/network/internet2. A university-led effort to develop advanced network applications and the network technologies needed to support them. The 200+ US universities that lead the project work closely with partners in industry and government, and with advanced networks around the world. http://www.internet2.edu/. "Internet2™" is a registered trademark
IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6)
The next version of the Internet Protocol. The current version is IPv4; IPv5 was an experimental real-time streaming protocol. IPv6 offers several improvements over IPv4, the most important of which is a vastly larger address space. See the IPv6 Forum (http://www.ipv6forum.com/) and the Internet2® IPv6 Working Group .

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J




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K



Keyword
A word or words related to your topic that will help you find information when conducting a search. You will want to use more than one keyword in order to find the best information.

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M



Mashup
Web application where content, data, or other services are combined from more than one source into an integrated experience.
Media literacy
Ability to "access, analyze, evaluate and create messages in a variety of forms from print to video to the Internet. Media literacy builds an understanding of the role of media in society as well as essential skills of inquiry and self-expression necessary for citizens of a democracy" .
Metacognition
Act of thinking about thinking. Metacognition challenges students to consider and regulate their own learning. Metacognitive strategies include assessing or reviewing current and previous knowledge, identifying gaps in that knowledge, planning gap-filling strategies, determining the relevance of new information and possibly revising beliefs or understandings about the subject .
metadata
Data about data, or information known about an object in order to provide access to the object. Usually includes information about intellectual content, digital representation data, and security or rights management information
Microblog
A blog on which one posts brief, frequent updates on one's activities. A popular example is Twitter.
Modeling
Instructional strategy in which the teacher demonstrates to the student the behaviors, skills or competencies that students are to learn, with the expectation that the students will copy the model. Modeling often involves thinking aloud or talking about how to work through a task.
multicast
A set of technologies that makes efficient one-to-many and many-to-many real-time communication possible on the network. See the Internet2® Multicast Working Group.
Myspace.com
(http://www.Myspace.com) is a social networking Web site offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music and videos internationally.

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N



Ning
Ning helps students and teachers build a social networking site that is customizable, attractive and easily created.

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Open source
This refers to releasing the source code to an application, usually with the intent that others can freely edit and use the source code so long as they also release the source code with their changes.

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Personal Learning Network (PLN
A personal or professional learning network (PLN) involves an individual's topic-oriented goal, a set of practices and techniques, aimed at attracting and organizing a variety of relevant content sources, selected for their value to help the owner accomplish a professional goal or personal interest.
Plagiarism
Using the ideas, language or work of another person without giving them credit.
Podcast
Digitalized audio files that are stored on the Internet and downloaded to listeners' computers or MP3 players. Although other file formats may be used, audio files are usually saved in the MP3 format. The term "podcast" comes from iPod™ , the popular MP3 player.
Posting (or Post)
Information added to a website. For example, if someone adds new information to their blog, that would be their latest posting. Also, "Comments" are opinions, thoughts and links that site visitors add to posts.
Primary vs. secondary
Original artwork, documents, records or research as opposed to resources created by analyzing or interpreting primary sources (e.g., original paintings vs. a book about the paintings).
Public domain
Art, literature, photographs or music that is available for use by anyone, without cost, because the material has not been copyrighted or because the copyright has expired.

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R



RSS/Web Feeds
Really Simple Syndication (RSS) is the acronym used to describe the standard for the syndication of Web content. RSS is an XML-based format and while it can be used in different ways for content distribution, its most widespread usage is in distributing news headlines on the Web (Webopedia). An RSS feed (sometimes simply called a 'web feed') contains either full or summarized articles without all the fluff contained on the Web site. These feeds can be read by other Web sites or by RSS readers.

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S



Search engine
Software that searches for data based on specific criteria or a Web site that maintains an index and short summaries of billions of pages on the Web. Search engines can differ dramatically in the way they find and index the material on the Web and in the way they search indexes from the user's query. Every Web search engine site uses a search engine that it has either developed itself or has purchased from a third party.
Second Life
(http://www.secondlife.com) is an Internet-based 3-D virtual world. This simulation's nine million participants use their avatars (digital representations of themselves) to explore, socialize, participate in individual and group activities and create and trade items (virtual property) and services.
Self-assessment
Assessment technique in which learners develop internal standards, compare their performance, behaviors or thoughts to those standards, and then use their observations to improve learning. Self assessment requires students to engage in reflection of their own learning and to focus not just on the task or the product, but also on the process. Self-assessment tools include journaling, rating scales, check lists, questionnaires and rubrics
Semantic Web
Is an extension of the current Web that puts data into a common format so that instead of humans working with individual search engines (e.g., Google, Ask Jeeves) to locate information, the search engines themselves feed into a single mechanism that provides this searching on its own. Sometimes called Web 3.0, this technology will enable integration of virtually all kinds of information for more efficient and comprehensive retrieval.
Social Bookmarking
Similar to weWb browser bookmarks, social bookmarking stores individual pages online and allows you to 'tag' them. For people who like to frequently bookmark Web pages, this can provide an easier way to organize the bookmarks.
Social Networking
The process of building online communities, often accomplished both through 'groups' and 'friends lists' that allow greater interaction on Web sites.
Standards
Statements of what students should know and be able to demonstrate. Various standards have been developed by national organizations, state departments of education, individual districts and schools.
Subject headings
Specific words or phrases used to describe the contents of an article or publication. These terms form a controlled vocabulary that is consistently used to categorize and reference materials in a catalog or index. Materials in libraries are categorized according to standard subject headings assigned by experts.
Summative assessment
This type of assessment occurs at the end of the learning process and is intended to evaluate student performance. It also provides feedback that can be used to redesign learning experiences.

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Tag / Tag Cloud
Commonly used in blogs, site authors attach keyword descriptions (called tags) to identify images or text within their site as a categories or topic. Web pages and blogs with identical tags can then be linked together allowing users to search for similar or related content. If the tags are made public, online pages that act as a Web-based bookmark service are able to index them. Tags can be created using words, acronyms or numbers. Tags are also called tagging, blog tagging, folksonomies (short for folks and taxonomy), or social bookmarking.
Technology literacy
Ability to responsibly use appropriate technology to communicate, solve problems and access, manage, integrate, evaluate and create information to improve learning in all subject areas and to acquire lifelong knowledge and skills in the 21st century.
Textual literacy
Ability to read, write, analyze and evaluate textual works of literature and personal and professional documents.
Thesis statement
A clear, concise statement that requires proof, in the form of evidence or documentation. The statement asserts something that must be proved. A simple fact is not a thesis statement.
Trackback
A system used for a blog to automatically recognize when another blog links to an article, usually creating a list of 'trackback' links at the bottom of the article.

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V



Visual literacy
Ability to "understand and use images, including the ability to think, learn and express oneself in terms of images".

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W



Web 2.0
Web 2.0 is the term given to describe a second generation of the World Wide Web that is focused on the ability for people to collaborate and share information online. Web 2.0 basically refers to the transition from static HTML Web pages to a more dynamic Web that is more organized and is based on serving Web applications to users. Other improved functionality of Web 2.0 includes open communication, with an emphasis on Web-based communities of users and more open sharing of information. Over time, Web 2.0 has been used more as a marketing term than a computer-science-based term. Blogs, wikis and Web services are all seen as components of Web 2.0.
Web Mashup
The most recent trend of the Web is the 'opening up' of Web sites whereby they allow other Web sites access to their information. This allows information from multiple Web sites to be combined for creative effect, like the information from Twitter and Google Maps being combined to create a visual representation of 'tweets' coming in from all across the map.
Webinar
A Web-based seminar, presentation, lecture, workshop or seminar that is transmitted over the Web. A key feature of a Webinar is its interactive elements -- the ability to give, receive and discuss information. Contrast Webinar with Webcast, in which the data transmission is one way and does not allow interaction between the presenter and the audience.
Widgets / Gadgets
A widget is a small piece of transportable code, for example a calculator or a countdown to a movie's release. Widgets can be placed on Web sites like a social networking profile, a custom home page or a blog. The word 'gadget' is often used to refer to a widget that is designed for a specific Web site, like iGoogle gadgets.
Wiki
Refers to software that fosters collaboration and communication online. Wikis enable students to create, comment upon and revise collaborative projects.
Wiki / Wiki Farm
A wiki is a Web site designed for multiple people to collaborate by adding and editing content. Wikipedia is an example of a wiki. A wiki farm is a collection of individual wikis, usually hosted by the same Web site.
Writing process
Pedagogical term referring to a set of steps an individual takes while writing. They include prewriting, writing, revising, editing and publishing.

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YouTube.com
(http://www.Youtube.com) is a popular video sharing Web site where users can upload, view and share video footage, including movie clips,TV clips and music videos, as well as amateur content such as student-produced videos.

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